November 28, 2007

Harvey does not in fact want to eat you

As an ugly American, I haven't heard of any of the parties involved, including Heat Magazine, but the sentiments are familiar. Make fun of a kid with a disability, get called out for it, issue a heartfelt apology, hope that people start buying your product again.

Heat magazine apologises to Jordan for using disabled son on sticker.

I am a steadfast advocate of freedom of speech, but it's nice to see someone get bitten on the ass for abusing that freedom. Dicks.

5 comments:

ysabelkid said...

Ugh, Heat is one of those celeb-bashing mags that leave a bitter taste in my mouth whenever I see it on newsstands. Jordan is most famous for her huge mammaries, which makes her a great target for drek such as Heat, but how they could think it would be a good idea to poke fun at her child, disabled or not, is beyond me. Just one more thing that fills me with disgust about the paparazzi and their employers.

kim said...

I'm also a firm believer in free speech -- but I also believe that part of having a freedom means that you also have to accept the responsibility of using that freedom appropriately, and you also have to accept the consequences when you don't. They said something schmucky, and they got called on it; the system works.

Anonymous said...

One more person here who strongly supports free speech....but I don't even get it. Why anyone at Heat would think that was funny or in any way even logical, is beyond me. To me, not only is it offensive, bad, stupid and distasteful, it simply does not make sense. Seriously, what were they thinking? I hope they (the idiots at Heat) get what they deserve.

Anonymous said...

Well there is freedom of speech and freedom of speech in the USA. I could NOT understand this article until I realized this was UK based mag. Here no government commission could investigate.

jano said...

One of the benefits of living in the US is that you don't get the full blast of Jordan/Peter Andre/Dwight Yorke (although he's a more minor player).

There's no constitutional right to free speech either in the UK or Australia (where I am) - there is a constant attempt to balance rights and privileges and abuses such as this.