July 28, 2017

Lulu



Today we said goodbye to a member of our family. Today, we lost sweet, sweet Lulu.

She joined our little family fourteen years ago, at a difficult time for us. In the fateful summer of 2003, in the quest to discover the reason for her wordlessness, Schuyler underwent a very traumatic MRI, one where she had to be anesthetized through an IV in the back of her hand. It was awful, and it left us all feeling exhausted and emotionally drained. “You know what?” I said a day or two later. “We’re going to get a motherfucking puppy!”

And that’s how Lulu came to join us.



She was the smallest in her litter, the only black pug in the bunch. She was scrappy, but she had the buggiest eyes and the smushiest face. She was the pug-iest pug in the litter, and had the sweetest disposition. I knew as soon as I saw her that she was the dog for me.

And she always was.

Lulu travelled the streets of New Haven, Connecticut with little Schuyler in her Radio Flyer wagon, and then moved with us to Austin and later to Plano. She watched Schuyler grow from a toddler to a young woman. Lulu bonded deeply with our late Boston terrier Petey, even having a litter of ridiculously cute and rowdy puppies with him about ten years ago, and she endured the addition of Max and his wild shenanigans. A few weeks ago, when we brought our new puppy home, she patiently endured Oscar’s puppy antics, too. She was subjected to endless nicknames, from Samurai Housefly to George Squashington to Fatbug to The Smash. One Halloween, she let us dress her like the Devil with no complaint. Lulu was patient, and she was game for anything. For fourteen years, she has been a constant companion, snorting and farting her gentle way through our lives.



A few days ago, she stopped eating. She also became incontinent and lethargic. When we took her to the vet this morning, we were looking for an answer, a way to restore her to her tail-wagging, happy self. (When Lulu was especially pleased with something, she let one fang stick out of her little sea monster mouth.) We didn’t think we would be leaving without a dog.

The vet gave us some options, expensive surgery that might make sense for a younger dog. But when he gently suggested that this option, and its long recovery, might “buy a little more time”, we knew what he meant. It would buy US more time. Months of pain and discomfort for Lulu, so that we could have more time with her. Our quality of life, not hers. In the end, it was an incredibly difficult choice, and at the same time, a really clear one. Letting her go was the right thing to do.

And yet, all day I’ve felt an unreasonable, impossible impulse. I want to go back to the vet, to hand them our receipt and tell them that I’ve changed my mind, that I’m selfish and cruel but I want more time, one more day even. I want to undo this thing we all did.

I want my dog back. I want my dear friend.


(As we sat waiting for the vet this morning, I took what ended up being my last photo of Lulu. I'm glad I did. For all her pain, she looked like her old self in the moment. She looked at me with love, and, I desperately hope, with forgiveness.)

2 comments:

Calliope said...

Rob, so sorry to hear about Lulu. She sounds like a most amazing dog, friend, and family member. You made the right decision for her; you can see the love and gratitude in her eyes. Wishing you peace.

Sherry Williams said...

I am so sorry . I lost my Husband and our beloved Lucy within a few months . Lucy who was around 20 just gave up when Dennis died.

The look in Lulu's eyes tell me she trusted you to make the right decision . You did.

Sherry